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M376 Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Ray Money, Jr., a freshman at Georgia Tech, is interested in taking part in a work-study program mentioned in a Council of Federated Organizations memo. He is uncertain about how useful he can be due to his age but asks for more information. The original recipient is not known, but a handwritten note instructs to forward the letter to Ed Hamlett.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Dial Parratt, a Princeton University student from Mississippi, writes to a friend, Hunter (last name unknown), to inquire about a freedom march in which Princeton students were invited to participate. Parratt writes that some Princeton students questoned this particular activity, despite their support of civil rights demonstrations. Parratt writes of plans to stay at Princeton until final exams are over and of hopes to return to Mississippi during the summer to work with Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.);

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Anne Braden's letter states her commitment to civil rights and expresses her frustration with being unable to participate in the civil rights movement due to her daughter Anita's heart condition. The document also has a hand-written note from Braden to Ed [Hamlett].

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Marjorie Ann Henderson, a student at Maryville College in Maryville, Tennessee, writes to Ed [Hamlett], state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), to tell him school will be out in two weeks and she will be coming to Mississippi to participate in the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Bruce Maxwell, in his letter to Ed [Hamlett], expresses his reservations and aspirations for poor whites, African-Americans, and the Freedom Democratic Party in Mississippi.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Cele Meyer, in her letter to Ed [Hamlett], explains that family responsibilities will prevent her from participating in the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Susan Solf writes to Ed [Hamlett], state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), that despite strong pressure from her father, she will participate in the Mississippi Freedom Project. Two photographs of Solf are included.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Shaw writes that, despite his use of a wheelchair, he is willing to work in any capacity that Ed Hamlett, state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), deems appropriate.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Sue Thrasher's application to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) summer project in Mississippi covers her formal education, useful skills, college activities, social memberships, job history and hometown newspaper affiliation.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. This internal newsletter for Council of Federated Organization (COFO) staff members covers false arrests connected with civil rights activities, new legislation in Mississippi, and upcoming projects of various civil rights organizations.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. This newsletter contains six pages of text, largely edited by Eric Blanchard, and ten photographs by Ken Thompson. The newsletter explains the history of voting in Mississippi, the voter registration movements underway in 1964, and the proposed Voting Rights Bill of 1965. A large portion of the content details the progress of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) in challenging the seats of five Mississippi congressmen.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection; This flyer outlines the plans of a group called Assembly of Unrepresented People to gather at the House of Representatives in Washington, D. C. to protest the US involvement in Vietnam. It also lists workshops and programs that will be held before and during the protest.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Diana Chiarky's letter replies to a May 29 letter from Ed Hamlett about Mississippi Freedom Project work. Chiarky asks about requirements, length of assignment, and a salary. She also expresses interest in self-fulfillment and uncertainty about being able to withstand possible intimidation.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. In Susan Solf's letter to Ed [Hamlett], Mississippi state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), she writes of her inability to raise enough money to travel to the training session as the reason why she will be unable to participate in the Project until possibly later in the summer.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Feeling that working with the White Folks Project (WFP) in Mississippi would put his Mississippi parents in jeopardy, Philip Alden asks to be assigned duties with the southwest Georgia Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Philip Alden's letter indicates frustration caused by a lack of communication from the White Folks Project (WFP), and by his inability to forward a $50 check for the Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. In the notecard, Margaret [Burnham?] writes to Ed [Hamlett], Mississippi's state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), to express her view that the Project is losing its good people. Possible author of this note is Margaret Burnham.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Janet McNeill writes to Ed Hamlett, Mississippi's state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), to tell him that due to unforeseen family circumstances, she must decline being a part of the Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Janet McNeill writes that due to unforeseen family circumstances she must decline being a part of the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. The document is the application of Janet McNeill for the Mississippi Summer Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. The document contains Marcia Aranoff's recommendation that Jan [Janet] McNeill be included in the Mississippi Freedom Project as a worker.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Robert B. McNeill, the father of Janet McNeill, gives his permission for her to participate in the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. This document is the information card on Janet McNeill.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Soren Sorenson writes to Ed Hamlett, Mississippi state director of the White Folks project (WFP), to communicate travel plans to Ohio and Mississippi for orientation and work with the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Anne Strickland writes to Ed Hamlett, Mississippi state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), to tell him she will miss the training sessions. She also writes that she will probably be unable to post bond if she is arrested, since she will only have $20 left on her arrival in Mississippi.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Anne Strickland writes to Ed Hamlett, Mississippi state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), to tell him that her parents will provide bail money, if needed, and that she may be able to arrive in Mississippi by July 21.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Anne Strickland writes to Ed Hamlett, Mississippi state director of the White Folks Project (WFP), that she will arrive in Jackson on July 17 in time to attend the orientation that weekend.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Due to his work with a parish, Rolland Kidder informs Ed Hamlett, Mississippi state director of the White Folks Project, that he must cancel his plans to work in the Mississippi Freedom Project. He offers that, if needed for a week in August, he may be able to arrange leave from work.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. The memorandum is Rolland Kidder's withdrawal of participation in the Mississippi Freedom Project.

From the Hamlett (Ed) White Folks Project Collection. Marion Palfi, who is doing a nationwide, photographic study on events since the Brown v. Board of Education decision by the Supreme Court, writes to Ed Hamlett seeking to interview and photograph the work of the Mississippi Freedom Project.

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