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M393 McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; In the pamphlet, Sass argues that segregation is an American institution and that the Civil Rights movement is a Communist propaganda machine dedicated to weakening the United States through biological amalgamation of its races. He says that African Americans have a better life than any other population descended from Africans around the world. He also erroneously compares the separation of the races to the biological speciation of birds.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Colmer asserts the actions of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U. S." and the Vietnam War protestors are inspired by the Communism.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet reveals that Communism's ultimate goal is "Black Supremacy,"a Soviet South," and "then a Soviet America."

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The author maintains that trickery and propaganda from Communist-affiliated organizations, such as the National Advancement for the Association of Colored People, and the American Civil Liberties Union, have pressured certain Congresspersons into promoting civil rights legislation.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Pamphlet alleges that the people who direct and subsidize the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) have records of affinity for, affiliation with, and particpation in Communist, Communist-front subversive organizations, activities, and causes.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet discusses the influence the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) has on U. S. Congressional legislation, and provides a scoreboard of how the U. S. 84th Congress voted on certain civil rights-related issues.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet contains a series of letters from Dr. Dotson McGinnis Nelson, President of Mississippi College, who believes in the segregation of the white and Negro races, and from Tom, an alumnus of the College, who believes in the contrary views.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet provides statistical information on the lives of African Americans.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet presents the southern rationale for segregation, and describes African Americans as having an inherent deficiency in mental ability, and a natural indolence.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; From a segregationist position, James C. Davis discusses the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision, and presents ways in which to oppose integration.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Simmons discusses segregation in the South, compares it to segregation in the Mid-west and in the North, argues segregation is a constitutionally protected right, and maintains the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Urban League are Communist-dominated organizations.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet notes the integration conflicts in Mississippi, and endeavors to promote a positive image of Mississippians.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet presents a defense of States' Rights, and argues the states have a legal right to continue the segregationist way of life.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet uses evolution as a defense for racial separation.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamplet stresses that only by a separate program of friendly cooperation between the races, with separateness in social life, can the races go forward in promoting the talents of races and can contribute to the welfare and happiness of both.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; By literary publication and the use of the national media, the Educational Fund of the Citizens' Councils, incorporated hopes to promote a campaign for states' rights and racial integrity.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Williams maintains the states have the right to declare a decision of the federal government, such as the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision, as illegal, invalid, and of no force and effect.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The writer stresses that the U. S. Supreme Court in its Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas decision overstepped its authority, since such an enactment rightly belongs to the United States Congress.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Circuit Judge M. M. McGowan, in a question and answer format, explains the meaning of interposition, and discusses its varied aspects.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet stresses the need for segregation among the races to protect the United States from decline as a civilization.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet maintains the 1954 U. S. Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, and President Eisenhower's use of federal government troops to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, are unconstitutional actions.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; United States Senator James O. Eastland, from Mississippi, defends states' rights and segregation in schools, proclaims the integration efforts of such organizations as the National Advancement for the Advancement of Colored People, the National Council of Churches of Christ, and the Rockefeller Foundation are Communist inspired organizations, which use the national media to foster their views.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The pamphlet published by the Mississippi State Junior Chamber of Commerce states that its purpose is to explain parts of the story of the University of Mississippi's forced integration that the media ignored. The pamphlet asserts that Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy acted illegally and impatiently when they sent Federal marshals and troops to integrate the University. It mainly contends that the Kennedy administration violated the state's right to organize and manage their own public schools.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Ross's address uses Christian scriptural quotes to support racial segregation. He denies that race prejudice exists in Mississippi and alleges that the South has done African Americans a favor by teaching them to be civilized. He also claims that the Civil Rights movement is merely a front to disseminate Communist values in the United States.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; In this pamphlet, Landry asserts that integrationists are trying to reunite the races that God separated in the Old Testament story of the Tower of Babel. He asserts that new anthropological and psychological theories of racial equality are pseudoscientific and backed by Communist interests. Landry cites some Old Testament quotations that he interprets as implying that segregation is ordered by God, and he asserts that race amalgamation will be lead to the downfall of Christianity. He also compares African Americans' social condition to that of Jews, Italians, Germans, and Irish in order to support his argument that African Americans' place at the bottom of the United States' social structure is a result of their lack of effort.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; In this pamphlet Carey Daniel contends that God created segregation. He uses Old and New Testament quotations to support his argument that Africans were turned black due to the transgressions of either Ham or Nimrod, and that God intended them to stay black in order to facilitate the separation of the races. Daniel purports that Civil Rights organizations are Communist-inspired pressure groups that seek to hybrid the races of the United States so that our country will be easy to enslave.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; In this pamphlet published by the White Citizens' Council of Winona, Mississippi, Gillespie states that racial separation is the way to support racial harmony. He says that Soviet Communists are behind the Civil Rights movement, because they want to break down the barriers between races so that racial amalgamation will occur. He contends that school integration will lead to intermarriage, and he cites Biblical and pseudoscientific reasons that segregation must continue. He also quotes Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Booker T. Washington.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; D. B. Red states that God implemented segregation after the flood and enforced it all through the Old Testament. He quotes the Bible to support his belief that segregation of races was ordained by God and that race-mixing is an instrument of the Devil. He also quotes Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln to support his view that racial integration is undesirable. Red also contends that religious leaders who support integration have been duped by an influx of Communist rhetoric that seeks to undermine the social structure of the United States.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; The Jewish author of this pamphlet prefers to remain unknown, because he is afraid some people will ridicule his support of segregation. He points out that all of the Jews in the United States do not necessarily agree with the Anti-Defamation League and the American Jewish Congress's support of school integration. He feels that integration in the public schools will severely decrease the security of students and the quality of the education they receive. He promotes the White Citizens Councils as organizations that speak out against ending segregation and also help African Americans advance. He also notes that African Americans must desire to advance themselves and that legislation alone will not accomplish a better life for African Americans.

From the McCain (William D.) Pamphlet Collection; Mrs. B. J. Gaillot, Jr. seeks to convince readers that God gave Moses a law of segregation along with the ten commandments on Mt. Sinai. She quotes many Bible passages to prove, according to her interpretation, that God intended for human populations to be separated by race and religion. She also quotes from patriotic songs like "America the Beautiful" and "God Bless America." Her pamphlet also includes a chart that shows the differences in some book names in Protestant and Catholic Bibles.

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