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M341 Campbell (Will D.) Papers

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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Flyer from the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Flyer distributed by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) used to publicize the upcoming Freedom Vote. The cover features three black-and-white photographs depicting life in Mississippi with regard to race relations. The back of the flyer provides information about the election, including how to participate, the campaign platform, and a brief history of the voter registration movement in Mississippi.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will Campbell to Rev. Aubrey Brown, dated March 14, 1957, sent in response to an inquiry by Brown. Campbell discusses several instances of harassment of members of the clergy as a result of their views against segregation and for civil rights.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Essay written by Campbell in which he addresses the topics of race relations and Christian action toward those who support segregation. He notes that Christians should embrace the differences among humans and oppose segregation.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will Campbell to Dr. McLeod (misspelled as MacLeod in the letter) Bryan of Wake Forest College regarding Campbell's dismissal from the University of Mississippi in October 1956. Campbell had served as the Director of Religious Life and the secretary of the "Y" at Ole Miss. Campbell maintains that he was not dismissed, but voluntarily resigned.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will Campbell to Merrimon Cuninggim (spelled Cunningim in the document) of the Danforth Foundation, dated May 15, 1964. As the Director of the newly-formed Committee of Southern Churchmen, Campbell provides background information about the new organization and discusses their intended direction.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will Campbell to Rev. Robert C. Dodds, dated November 8, 1962, written in response to a memo from Dodds. Campbell explains his reaction and concerns regarding the proposed changes in the policies and activities of the National Council of Churches.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Typewritten letter and proposal written by Hugh and Anne Wire to Leslie Dunbar of the Southern Regional Council, dated July 11, 1964." A Presbyterian minister, Hugh Wire writes for advice in relocating to a city in the South in order to implement his proposed plan for ministry there. Included is a detailed narrative of the proposal.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will Campbell to Rev. William Dobbins, dated January 27, 1964. Campbell discusses his work with the Committee of Southern Churchmen as well as the upcoming organizational meeting to be held in Nashville. Thirty people from around the South elected to serve on the Committee were to attend.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Leslie W. Dunbar to Rev. J. Martin England, dated September 23, 1963, in which Dunbar thanks Rev. England for his concern about the loss of ministers in the South. Many ministers were forced to leave the South as a result of their civil rights activities. Dunbar served as Executive Director of the Southern Regional Council.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Typewritten letter from Leslie W. Dunbar to Will Campbell, dated March 8, 1965. Includes five pages of notes on Mississippi which Dunbar request that Campbell keep to himself. Provides details about the political climate in Mississippi with regard to race relations and his opinion about the future.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Jane Eddy, dated February 14, 1963. Campbell informs Eddy that he is sending her various newspapers and articles as evidence that The Free Press was not the only liberal newspaper in the state of Mississippi. He also mentions the importance of newspapers in the lives of down-trodden citizens.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Sam H. Franklin, dated November 5, 1964, in which Campbell provides information regarding civil rights activities in Mississippi. He notes that Franklin would be id

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Memo from Will D. Campbell to Dr. W.C. Fields, dated February 18, 1965, entitled "Race in Public Relations" Campbell writes to Fields, the Director of Public Relations for the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) Executi

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers. Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Dr. Harold Fleming, dated May 13, 1964. Campbell discusses a recent meeting between a member of the Committee of Southern Churchmen and the administrative secretary for the Governor of Mississippi where the Governor's assistant discussed concern about the growth of white supremacist groups in the state.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. Ray Gibbons, dated May 12, 1964, regarding the intentions of the Committee of Southern Churchmen in Mississippi. Campbell discusses the current situation in th

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers. Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. Duncan Gray, dated November 5, 1964. Campbell writes for Gray's opinion on the organization of an interracial Committee for Mississippi Churchmen.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers. Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. J.C. Herrin, dated March 5, 1962, in which Campbell discusses the situation of Rev. R.B. Smith of Indianola, Mississippi. Smith, a pastor, was forced to leave Indianola by the local White Citizens council, and Campbell is requesting financial help from Herrin for Rev. Smith.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. Luther Holcomb, dated October 19, 1962. During a recent visit to the University of Mississippi, Campbell's connection to Holcomb allowed him to see James Meredith without trouble.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. Charles Jones, dated November 14, 1963. Campbell discusses the pressures on members of the clergy from opponents of the civil rights movement. Many ministers left the South because of such pressure and their stance on civil rights. He also requests that Jones consider attending an informal conference in December of 1963.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Rev. Charles Jones, dated October 12, 1964. Campbell discusses the proposed organization of a group of interracial Churchmen of Mississippi, and his hesitancy to become involved because of possible opposition from the National Council of Churches.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Seven-page document from the Ecumenical Center for Renewal (ECR) with a cover letter signed by R.B. Kochtitzky. Provides detailed plans for a model for twelve proposed regional centers of renewal in the South, focusing on the center to be developed in Jackson, Mississippi. Also includes a comprehensive budget for the proposed program.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten memo from Will D. Campbell to Dr. J. Oscar Lee, dated August 25, 1958. Campbell expresses hesitation in abandoning Christians in Mississippi working on behalf of the civil rights movement, as well as apprehension with regard to the segregation laws in the state at the time.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter on letterhead of the Committee of Southern Churchmen from Will D. Campbell to David Mathis, editor of Sidelines, dated October 28, 1968. Campbell discusses an article printed in a recent issue of the student paper of Middle Tennessee State University. He points out that the article raised important questions, but did so in a way that could be perceived as offensive.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Typewritten letter from Garry Oniki, Executive Coordinator of the Committee for Racial Justice Now, to Will D. Campbell, stamped May 20, 1964. The writer requests that Campbell write a letter to the Federal Communications Committee (FCC) in support of petitions filed against two Jackson, Mississippi, television stations, WLBT and WJTV. The petitions were filed with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on April 15, 1964, and requested that the licenses of the two stations be denied on charges of discrimination against minorities and failure to represent public interests.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Typewritten memo from Dr. Huber F. Klemme, Associate Director of the Council for Christian Social Action, to Selected Ministers and Laymen of the United Church of Christ, no date given. The Council for Christian Social Action, in conjunction with the Committee for Racial Justice Now, recruited ministers and laymen as volunteers for the Mississippi Freedom Project of 1964.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Description of the goals and objectives of the church for the upcoming Mississippi Summer Project of 1964. Provides details of the major projects that were planned and mentions how volunteers could participate.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Walker Percy, dated September 2, 1965, in which Campbell asks Percy to serve on the board of the Committee of Southern Churchmen. He also discusses the goals and objectives of the committee particularly the assistance to the on-going civil rights movement.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Notes regarding P.D. East and the future of his newspaper, The Petal Paper. The writer had been in touch with East to gather information regarding the precarious future of his paper after suffering economic reprisals from the White Citizen's council. Several national agencies sought to help East by soliciting for national advertisements.

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Essay written by Frederick B. Routh, dated January 29, 1956, which provides a commentary of the changing political and social climates of the South at the time. Stresses the concept of desegregation as supported by religious and governmental institutions. Also discusses the various organizations already at work in the South, such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Southern Regional Council (SRC).

From the Campbell (Will D.) Papers; Copy of a typewritten letter from Will D. Campbell to Sally Smith, dated January 11, 1957, written in response to earlier correspondence. Campbell advises Smith to approach her parents calmly with regard to the subjects of prejudices and race relations.

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