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M368 Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. An order from the Department of Public Safety suspending Miller's Mississippi driving privileges and the use of any vehicle owned by him. This order resulted from an October 1963 Holmes County traffic accident.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Letter from Joan [last name unknown] to Miller. Includes an inquiry about materials to be recovered from a car in Tchula, Christmas travel plans of the writer and Jane Stembridge, and future activities at Ruleville, Mississippi.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Letter from Dick [last name unknown] to Miller discussing planning phases of COFO's Mississippi Freedom Summer. Emphasis is put on the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the challenge planned for the Democratic convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Author also discusses trip to visit Miller and plans to do fund raising.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Letter to Julie Prettyman of SNCC's New York office. Miller expresses disappointment at failure of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and he asks for fund raising ideas.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Letter from Mary Zeno describing conditions and activities in Jackson. She mentions attempts to integrate public schools and describes the need for more money and permanent volunteers in that city.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Brief letter from Miller to Margaret [last name unknown], which includes an account of a labor dispute (presumably in California).

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Letter from Muriel Tillinghast, representing the SNCC Finance Committee. She requests that all money donations be made out to SNCC and provides other guidelines for donating materials.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Memo announcing an orientation session scheduled for August 31-September 9 in Atlanta for prople interested in becoming SNCC staff members. A $25 fee is required to be paid to fund the costs of the sessions.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. A letter inviting attendance at a memorial service for James Cheney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner on August 9, 1964, in Washington, D.C.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Proposal for SNCC volunteer program for community development in the Bay Area of California. The program represented an attempt to transfer the ideals and experience of Freedom Summer volunteers to other regions of the country.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Philosophical piece about the motivations, activities, strengths, and weaknesses of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Musings on forces impacting SNCC from within and without, including political pressure, the rising black power movement, and internal intellectual ferment.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Brief document explaining what, where, and why SNCC organizes groups of people for action. Includes some recommendations for more efficient future organizational work.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Planning document for a grass roots organizing project designed to reach poor Southern whites.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Agenda for a SNCC staff meeting at the Atlanta office, including new programs and tactics.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Draft of an article with editorial notes. The content relates to education, standard English, and social and political ramifications.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Tentative schedule for a seminar titled "The student and the South in the 60s" to be held August 30-September 5, 1965. Suggested topics include southern industrialization, education, and politics.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Confidential paper dealing with the conclusions and implications of the Freedom Budget, which advocated redistribution of wealth through tax policy; this response examines the fitness of the American economy for the task.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Draft of a SNCC fund-raising advertisement produced by the San Francisco office.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. An address to SNCC staff members and/or civil rights workers and a list of approximately 200 questions about Mississippi history and government. The questions are designed for use as part of the training of SNCC workers and to generate discussion at mass meetings hosted by civil rights workers.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Report by Terry Cannon on the status of The movement, a newspaper described in the report as SNCC's only regular publication. Cannon describes the status of the paper and lays out goals for the future, including changes in mailing and publication methods.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Financial reports of SNCC's operating expenses, income, and contributions between January and October 1964. Dates and coverage periods on individual pages vary.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Illustrated pamphlet expressing Black separatist or Black power sentiment.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Staff reports from a number of SNCC projects, compiled at the Atlanta office by Jon Steinberg. Most describe voter registration, labor organization, or similar grass roots activity. In some instances, the reports include detailed information about specific locales.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; This document outlines the events related to the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's (MFDP) Congressional challenge that occurred January 4, 1965. It describes the future steps through which the challenge will pass and asks for lawyers to go to Mississippi to take depositions from individuals who were denied the right to vote or were not allowed to register to vote to be presented as evidence in the case.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; This issue of the Congressional Report records the reports of both the majority and minority opinion of the Committee for Elections of the United States House of Representatives regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's (MFDP) challenge to the seating of Mississippi's five representatives in 1965. It also includes comments made by individuals on either side of the debate and reports vote statistics for the related resolution.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; This collection of documents about pending voting legislation in the 1960s. On the first page, James Farmer of the Congress of Racial Equality encourages all branches of the civil rights movement and all civil rights workers to support the purposed Voting Rights Act of 1965. The second page is on Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) letterhead. It advertises a press conference to publicize the future MFDP events and projects. The rest of the pages record recent events in the civil rights movement in the South that are meant to prove the climate is right for new voting legislation. They also address a few other current bills in which xivil rights workers would be interested.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; Mark DeWolf Howe, from Harvard Law School, discusses the 1870 statute on which the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) Congressional Challenge is based. He explains the statute and different interpretations of it.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; This narrative records how the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) was organized. It also gives details about instances in which the MFDP members were shut out of Mississippi State Democratic party meetings that they tried to attend." It also describes the instance in which members of the MFDP were refused seats at the National Democratic Party convention that was held in Jackson in 1964. The narrative also explains the MFDP's reasoning in refusing the compromise offered by the leaders of the convention which would allow MFDP members to be seated as guests with no voice or vote.

From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection; The memorandum from Leon Shull is typed on Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) letterhead that lists the national board members on the reverse side of the page. The content of the memo explains the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's (MFDP) Congressional challenge to national officers, board members, and chapter chairmen. In response to requests, Shull notes ADA's position on the challenge.

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