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M365 Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. A black and white photograph of the home of Rabbi and Mrs. Ben-Ami during the family's stay in Hattiesburg. The home is located at 2008 Adeline Street.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The worship service program includes the order of the service for Brotherhood Week (held at Temple B'nai Israel, Hattiesburg), lists participants in the service, and includes a letter from President Lyndon B. Johnson.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This digital copy of Rabbi David Z. Ben-Ami's University of Southern Mississippi identification card identifies him as a part-time instructor for the school year ending in June 1964 and is signed by University President William D. McCain.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This bulletin for Temple B'Nai Israel includes a message from Rabbi Ben-Ami on the meaning of the High Holy Days, a welcome to the new Rabbi, and a list of families in the B'Nai Israel community. It also includes information on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur for Jewish year 5724 (1963-1964).

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. Irene [last name unknown] writes to Rabbi and Rebetzin Ben-Ami from San Francisco about her speaking engagements there and how she misses Hattiesburg.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The memorial flyer commemorates Medgar Evers' murder in 1963 with a photograph of Evers and a quote from the Gospel of John.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This document by an unknown author maintains that Jews and Communists are brainwashing Americans by using control over the news media to advance views on civil rights. The author accuses Jews and Communists of harassing others into agreeing with an un-American agenda (the Civil Rights movement) and urges readers to stand against liberals and moderates.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The author urges Mississippians to resist the Civil Rights Bill and join a white boycott of Hattiesburg businesses whose owners and corporate partners are identified as supporters of civil rights.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This flyer advertises a campaign headed by comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory to send 20,000 turkeys to needy families in Mississippi. The flyer announces that for $5.00, Chicagoans can donate a Christmas dinner to a Mississippi family in memory of James Chaney, Medgar Evers, Andrew Goodman, and Mickey Schwerner.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This letter from W.G. Sims to Drew Pearson explains how turkeys donated by the "Christmas for Mississippi" project were distributed to needy families in the Hattiesburg area on Christmas Eve 1964.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This piece of Ku Klux Klan propaganda maintains that civil rights workers are Communists in disguise and that governmental officials are in league with them. An interview with an unnamed official of the KKK is printed, with the official responding to questions about the murders of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Mickey Schwerner.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This report by the Mississippi Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights describes the committee's procedures and lists its members, but it focuses mainly on the allegations of police brutality and obstruction of justice by state officials. Committee members cite cases of police misconduct and violence and note that their research has been hindered by governmental officials. Committee members also report on intimidation, threats, and violence encountered as a result of their position on the committee.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The pamphlet explains that the Committee of Concern is an interracial, interfaith group with the goal of raising and managing funds and equipment to rebuild burned churches in the Hattiesburg area. A photograph on the front cover of the pamphlet shows the remains of a burned church, and an excerpt from Isaiah 61 is printed on the second page.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This small slip of paper advocates hate as a positive virtue and labels persons as fence straddlers if they will not commit to active involvement in hate groups. The paper instructs recipients of the message to pass it on to other people.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Anne Braden to Rabbi Ben-Ami is typed on Southern Conference Educational Fund letterhead, and the left margin includes a list of the staff at the SCEF office in Louisville, Kentucky. Braden recalls meeting the Rabbi and encourages him to write an article about his experiences in Hattiesburg for the Patriot.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Edith Macy to Rabbi Ben-Ami is typed on National Urban League letterhead with the names and positions of staff members in the New York office in the left margin. Macy asks Rabbi Ben-Ami to report on the success of a mission in Biloxi.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath to Rabbi Ben-Ami is typed on Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC) letterhead. The letter responds to a previous letter from Rabbi Ben-Ami.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Samuel J. Simmons to Rabbi Ben-Ami is typed on United States Commission on Civil Rights letterhead. The letter notifies Rabbi Ben-Ami of his appointment to the Mississippi Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This document lists names, addresses and phone numbers of the members of the 1964 Mississippi Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. Details for some members are included, such as occupation and other civil rights or social activities.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from O.J. Keller to Rabbi Ben-Ami is typed on Abraham Lincoln Association letterhead and lists the association's officers and board members in the right margin of the page. Mr. Keller invites Rabbi Ben-Ami to the annual celebration of President Lincoln's birthday on February 12, 1965 in Springfield, Illinois. He informs the Rabbi that the guest of honor will be the former governor of Florida and Director of the Civil Rights Program, LeRoy Collins. Keller also asks Ben-Ami if he will answer questions about his experiences in Mississippi on a radio program.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This is the first page of an issue of The Temple journal, showing an article promoting a speaking engagement of Rabbi Ben-Ami on April 4, [1965]. Ben-Ami's topic was Jews in the Civil Rights Movement. Also shown is an article announcing an exhibition of the Hyman Cohen Judaica collection at Ring Hall, comprised of prints of engravings, etchings, and lithographs depicting Jewish history and ritual in Europe.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Robert Beech to Drew Pearson offers corrections and criticism concerning a column written by Pearson that appeared on Christmas Day 1964.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This a copy of a letter from Drew Pearson to Robert Beech. Pearson responds to Beech's January 4, 1965, letter in which Beech contends that Pearson published inaccuracies in a column that appeared on Christmas 1964.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter was once attached to a carbon copy of a letter from Drew Pearson to Robert Beech in which Pearson responds to a previous letter from Beech.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This letter from Robert Beech to Newton P. Cox is typed on National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America letterhead, which lists NCCC officers in the left margin. The letter concerns the alleged misrepresentation of facts by Drew Pearson in his Christmas Day 1964 column.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. This letter to the Editor of the Santa Barbara (Calif.) News-Press by Drew Pearson answers a letter by Rabbi Joseph Jasin. Jasin's letter was critical of Pearson's previous letter to the Editor, which addressed events related to the dismissal of Rabbi Ben-Ami from B'nai Israel congregation in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, due to his participation in the civil rights activities.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. Transcription of the March 18, 1965, radio broadcast of Edward P. Morgan on the resignation of David Z. Ben-Ami from Temple B'nai Israel (Hattiesburg, Mississippi).

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The document contains an editorial by Jerome Lipnick titled From where I stand. Mr. Lipnick discusses the forced resignation of Rabbi David Z. Ben-Ami from Temple B'nai Israel in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, for his civil rights activities.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. The letter from Mrs. Smith expresses her dismay at the forced resignation of Rabbi David Z. Ben-Ami from Temple B'nai Israel for his civil rights activities, about which she read in Drew Pearson's Christmas Day 1964 column. She urges the Temple B'nai congregation to reconsider this action and outlines her reasons against the backdrop of Biblical texts and historical context.

From the Ben-Ami (Rabbi David Z.) Papers. Mort Lewis urges Temple B'nai Israel to reconsider the dismissal of Rabbi Ben-Ami for his civil rights activities.

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