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M323 Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Report by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) describing the political and economic situation in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Includes a summary of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision in 1966 regarding municipal elections in Sunflower County, as well as a description of the MFDP plan to run candidates for local offices. A brief section is dedicated to the Sunflower County poverty program.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Press release by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), dated April 4, 1966, titled "Six Candidates File to Run in the State Democratic Party Primary." The statement announces the plans of the MFDP to run six candidates for Congress in the June 1966 election and gives a brief biography of the candidates. Those involved include: Rev. Clifton R. Whitley, Ralthus Hayes, Rev. Ed King, Rev. Clint Collier, and Lawrence Guyot.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Statement issued by candidates of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) Clifton Whitley, Ralthus Hayes, Edwin King, Clinton Collier, and Lawrence Guyot, announcing their separation from the Democratic Party of Mississippi. They cite the Democratic Party's support of white supremacy, segregation, and "Separate but Equal" policies as grounds for their action. They also state their refusal to comply with Mississippi Code Section 3129.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Statement issued by Clifton Whitley, Ralthus Hayes, Edwin King, Clinton Collier, and Lawrence Guyot of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) in opposition of Mississippi Code, Section 3129. The law stated that candidates for public office must support the platform of the party with which they are running, as well as the winners of the primary elections within their party. Includes excerpts from resolutions passed at the 1964 Mississippi Democratic Party state convention.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Report by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) describing the progress made in Sunflower County, Mississippi, with regard to the decision of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to nullify the municipal elections of the previous year. Also discusses the poverty program, federal registers, federal protection for African-American political activists, Congressional campaigns, and the MFDP candidates' contest of Mississippi Code Section 3129.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Bulletin released by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) regarding the June 7, 1966, primary elections. Discusses the increased violence against African Americans in Mississippi and the activities of the Ku Klux Klan. The MFDP has called for an increase in the federal presence in the state to protect African Americans who are attempting to register and vote. Also mentions the party's efforts to have the up-coming election postponed until more African Americans in Mississippi have registered to vote.

Transcribed copy of a Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) report of the results of the June 7, 1966, primary elections in Mississippi. Although the MFDP candidates did not win the primaries, members of the party were encouraged by the large numbers of African-American voters. Mentions the intention of MFDP candidates to run on the Independent ticket in the general election, and the shooting of James Meredith during the March against Fear.

Brochure from the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Brochure prepared by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) created to inform supporters of activities and intentions for the development of the Mississippi Freedom Project. Contains information about the following programs developed by SNCC: voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, a research project, a white community project, and a legal project. The final page offers suggestions for donation amounts and how monetary contributions will be used.

Booklet from the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Booklet published by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in an effort to inform the public about a piece of legislation intended to inflict genocide upon African Americans in the state of Mississippi. The booklet includes a formal definition of genocide, according to the Genocide Convention of the United States. The bill would make it punishable by law for unmarried women to give birth to children in the state of Mississippi. Those convicted could be sentenced to no less than 1 year and no more than 3 years for the first offense, and up to 5 years for the second offense.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Letter from the staff of the Mississippi Freedom Project to volunteers and friends, written on about October 24, 1964. Discusses the increasing incidents of police misconduct and violence aimed at African Americans in McComb, Mississippi. Asks readers for immediate help in securing greater federal support and protection to ensure the safety of African Americans.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Essay written in 1964 about the Mississippi Freedom Schools and their importance to the civil rights movement. Discusses the current educational situation in Mississippi schools and how Freedom Schools aim to fill in the gaps left by the educational system provided by the state for African-American children. Curriculum includes a wide variety of subjects, including remedial work in reading, math and basic grammar, seminars in political science and history, humanities, journalism, and creative writing. Also mentions the introduction of a bill to the Mississippi State Legislature requiring all schools in the state to be properly licensed. Includes a list of materials needed for the Freedom Schools, as well as drop-off points for donations.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memorandum composed by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in an effort to recruit volunteers and solicit financial support for the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964. Provides a brief history of the organization, as well as its objectives for the upcoming Summer Project. Major areas of activity included: Freedom Schools, community centers, voter registration, and special projects.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; News release by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), dated May 26, 1964, and titled "Whites Organize to Oppose Mississippi Summer Project." Statement warns those participating in the summer project of the increase in white supremacist organizations in Mississippi as well as acts of violence by such groups, like the Ku Klux Klan. Civil rights workers coming to Mississippi should expect more organized opposition than originally anticipated.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memo, presumably written by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), dated June 22, 1964, regarding the disappearance of three civil rights workers in Mississippi. James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner traveled from Meridian to Philadelphia, in Neshoba County, Mississippi, to investigate the bombing of Mt. Zion Church when they disappeared. This memo describes the circumstances surrounding their disappearance and the actions of local law enforcement officials regarding the situation.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Detailed outline of the programs developed by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization of concerned and committed students working together to promote civil rights. Details the various materials needed and offers suggestions for starting campus SNCC groups nationwide.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; List of bombings that occurred in Mississippi from June 16 to October 4, 1964. Prepared by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the incidents of violence are listed in order of date and location.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memo from Betty Garman (Robinson), Northern Coordinator for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), to friends of SNCC, campus contacts and others, dated October 27, 1964. Reports that eighteen civil rights workers are in jail in McComb, Mississippi, and that many others were arrested. Those in jail have remained there in protest to show the lack of involvement on the part of the federal government in the civil rights movement in Mississippi. This memo was sent in an effort to solicit support for a public opinion campaign, including letter writing and telephone chains, for increased participation of the federal government in ensuring the safety of civil rights workers.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memo from Betty Garman (Robinson), Atlanta SNCC office, to friends of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and campus contacts, dated October 28, 1964. Garman reports that the eighteen people jailed in McComb, Mississippi - voter registration workers and prospective applicants - have been released and all charges against them dropped. Five of those jailed reported some form of physical abuse while in jail. FBI officials were present in McComb, but reported to be inactive. Garman urges the formation of protest campaigns to inform others of this situation.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memo from Jon Else, presumably of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to all college contacts, dated November 1, 1964. Labeled "Urgent," the memo encourages immediate action in the form of telegrams to Democratic leaders and expanded media coverage. According to Else, the up-coming national election provides an opportunity to draw national attention to the racial and political situation in Mississippi.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; An extensive list of incidents of violence and discrimination in Mississippi in October 1964. The last page of the document lists the officers of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP)" Also included is the text of a telegram, dated October 30, 1964, which was sent to the Chairman of the Democratic National Convention by the Chairman of the MFDP in protest of unfair campaign practices.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Memo from Jon Else, Northern Campus Coordinator of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), to all returned summer volunteers, dated November 3, 1964. Discusses the Freedom Vote, the October Incident Report, and the Fast for Freedom. Reports the expected return for the Mississippi Freedom Vote, an estimated 60,000 ballots from 49 counties.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Report by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) that discusses the decision of the party to challenge the seating of five Congressional representatives from Mississippi. The MFDP argues that these representatives were unconstitutionally elected after the Mississippi Secretary of State refused to place the names of MFDP candidates on the November 1964 state ballots. Includes the plan of action for the Congressional Challenge, as well as background information on the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Newsletter released by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), dated April 25, 1965. Sections of interest include a report of an injunction against a Sunflower County registrar, information about upcoming demonstrations, new elections, and details about the Congressional Challenge, sponsored by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP).

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Statement released by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to publicize the fact that eight people were arrested in Belzoni, Mississippi, and remained in jail on charges of criminal syndicalism. Part of an attempt to raise $16,000 for bail, the statement also urges readers to take action by publicizing the situation in local newspapers and radio shows. SNCC calls for an increase in public pressure to help alleviate the situation.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; News release by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), entitled "Temple Turns Away Mixed Trio," designated for immediate release. Describes an incident in which a temple in Albany, Georgia, refused to allow an interracial group of students to enter the services. Also mentioned is the declaration of a boycott in Greenville, Mississippi, by the Greenville Student Movement.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Brief memorandum regarding the legal authority of the federal government in matters related to civil rights. According to the memo, the federal government has the authority in court to protect the right of citizens to vote. The document is divided into two major sections: Legal authority to the federal government in Civil Rights matters and Authority for the use of force by the federal government in Civil Rights matters. Also discusses other laws related to the protection of the right to vote.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; The newsletter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), this issue of the Student Voice (Vol. 5, no. 11) is dated May 19, 1964. Includes an article about the challenge to the seating of delegates at the Democratic National Convention by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP)" Another article discusses the response in Cambridge, Maryland, to a visit by Alabama Governor George Wallace. A section containing news from several towns in Mississippi and throughout the South is included on the last page.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; Newsletter entitled "The Voice of the Movement," distributed by the Hattiesburg, Mississippi, branch of the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), dated August 17, 1964. Volume 1, Issue 12 discusses various incidents occurring within the Fifth Congressional District, including the removal of an African-American woman from a city bus after she refused to move to the back of the bus at the request of the bus driver. Another incident involved the arrest of three COFO workers who were arrested while picketing and charged with interfering with an officer.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; The newsletter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), this issue of the Student Voice (Vol. 5, no. 21) is dated August 19, 1964. Front-page stories include a report on the funeral services of three civil rights workers (James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner) who were murdered near Philadelphia, Mississippi. Another article discusses the anticipated confrontation at the Democratic National Convention as a result of the challenge staged by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP)" A detailed list of incidents of harassment in Mississippi is included, as is a section of photographs related to the Civil Rights Movement.

From the Ellin (Joseph and Nancy) Freedom Summer Collection; The newsletter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), this issue of the Student Voice (Vol. 5, no. 22), is dated September 23, 1964. A major portion of the publication is dedicated to bombings and other violent incidents that occurred in McComb, Mississippi, in the summer of 1964. Other reports discuss the inclusion of African-American candidates on election ballots throughout the South, as well as other on-going political activities."(Note on images) At the time of publication, the layout of the text between pages two and three of the original document was such that text spanned the gutter. During the scanning of pages two and three, the Special Report section of the document was split right down the middle of a column of text. In this digtal reproduction, an image for the text that spans the gutter was inserted between the images for pages two and three, and marked for identification as "GUTTER TEXT".

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