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M336 Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection

Object Type: Collection
In Collection: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs Digital Collection



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Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, and Sara, dated June 30, 1964. Discusses civil rights work in the community of Riverton, near Clarksdale, Mississippi, and describes the dedication required to continue work through the end of the summer. Zwerling includes some details about the house in which he is staying, as well as his hostess.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 3, 1964. Discusses a recent meeting that was well-attended, as well as the COFO (Council of Federated Organizations) discouragement of public demonstrations. Zwerling also mentions that Congressman Fitz (William F.) Ryan recently visited Clarksdale, Mississippi.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 7, 1964. The letter is brief, and Zwerling states that he is busy and will write again soon.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 12, 1964. Discusses the change of emphasis in civil rights work in and around Clarksdale, Mississippi, from voter registration to Freedom registration for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and up-coming Freedom vote. Zwerling also mentions evening picnics given at the home of local civil rights leader, Aaron Henry.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 14, 1964. Discusses the focus of civil rights volunteers in Clarksdale, Mississippi, on registering local people for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) before the up-coming Freedom Vote.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 20, 1964. Discusses working for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) registering people to vote and the positive response received from this effort. Zwerling also discusses the upcoming Freedom Day, and notes the change in his living quarters.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 24, 1964. Discusses the success of recent precinct meetings as well as work for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP). Zwerling also mentions the upcoming Freedom Day.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated July 28, 1964. In the short note, he mentions voter registration work and the up-coming Freedom Day.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 3, 1964. Discusses an incident in which Zwerling was arrested for speeding, but not jailed. He also asks his parents for money for the project and car repairs.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 5, 1964. In this short note, Zwerling informs his parents of the amount of the fine he was charged for speeding.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 6, 1964. Zwerling updates his parents on his activities, including his efforts to set up contacts in Tunica, Mississippi, for SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) workers who will be arriving the fall. He also thanks them for money they recently sent.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 10, 1964. In this brief note, Zwerling notifies his parents that he moved to Marks.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 11, 1964. Discusses work in Marks, Mississippi, the possibility of future work in Tunica, and the recent convention of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in Jackson.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 17, 1964. Discusses plans to return home from Mississippi.

Typewritten letter from Matthew Zwerling to his parents, Israel and Florence Zwerling, dated August 26, 1965. Discusses plans to leave Mississippi and offers suggestions for spending time with his family upon his return to New York.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection,; Photograph of civil rights volunteers taken at the Freedom Summer Training Session in Oxford, Ohio, in 1964. The training session was held to prepare volunteers for work in Mississippi. Andrew Goodman (third row, fourth from the right) is seated next to Mathew Zwerling (third row, third from the right). Goodman was later murdered in Philadelphia in 1964. This is the one of the last known photographs of Goodman.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection.; Photograph taken during the summer of 1964 at the Freedom Summer office in Clarksdale, Mississippi. The man standing in the center of the group of people is tentatively identified as Matthew Zwerling.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection.; Photograph of Matthew Zwerling speaking at the Freedom Summer office in Clarksdale, Mississippi, in the summer of 1964.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter by the Mississippi Assistance Project of Westchester County, New York, distributed to solicit funds for truck rentals needed to deliver supplies to freedom centers in Mississippi.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Brochure produced by the Mississippi Assistance Project of Hartsdale, New York, to solicit donations of food, clothing, toys, or money for freedom centers in Mississippi.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten report from the Free Southern Theater, a theatrical group formed by John O'Neal and Gilbert Moses, members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). The Free Southern Theater traveled throughout Mississippi, Memphis, and New Orleans during Freedom Summer 1964. The report discusses the theater's history, focus, programs related to community involvement, and its production of the play,"In White America."

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter from Senator Kenneth B. Keating to Dr. Israel Zwerling dated June 23, 1964. Keating responds to Zwerling's telegram about the disappearance of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwernerin Mississippi and assures him that the FBI has entered the investigation.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection; Copy of a typewritten telegram from Senator Kenneth B. Keating to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, dated June 23, 1964, about the disappearance of two New York civil rights workers, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, in Mississippi. Goodman and Schwerner disappeared with Mississippian James Chaney near Philadelphia, Mississippi, in June 1964. Keating recommends that the Department of Justice assist in the investigation and suggests that U.S. Marshals be assigned to protect civil rights workers in Mississippi.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter from Congressman William F. Ryan to Dr. Israel Zwerling dated June 24, 1964. Ryan relates his efforts to involve the President, Attorney General, and other Federal authorities on behalf of missing civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney in Mississippi. Ryan mentions a speech he gave in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, June 23. Ryan also writes of a request as early as June 15 that U.S. Marshals be assigned to help protect civil rights workers in Mississippi.

Typewritten letter on United States Senate letterhead from New York Senator Jacob K. Javits to Dr. Israel Zwerling, dated July 2, 1964. Javits thanks Zwerling for his recent letter concerning the safety of students participating in civil rights work, and assures him that every effort will be made to provide protection for civil rights workers in the South. (Note: A copy of a June 18, 1964 Congressional Record statement by Javits was included with this letter and available in the manuscript collection.)

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter from Senator Jacob K. Javits to Dr. Israel Zwerling, dated July 7, 1964. Javits thanks Zwerling for his letter about the safety of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Mississippi. (Note: A copy of a June 18, 1964, Congressional Record statement by Javits was included with this letter and is available in the manuscript collection.)

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Copy of a typewritten letter from Dr. Israel Zwerling to President Lyndon B. Johnson dated July 8, 1964. Zwerling describes his position as the father of a civil rights volunteer in the Mississippi Summer Project and thanks Johnson for his efforts regarding the missing civil rights workers in Mississippi, Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney. Zwerling also writes about a visit to Mississippi by New York Representative Ryan and a dinner with Zwerling's son. He suggests that an increased federal presence in Mississippi might make a difference for the movement.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter from Senator Abraham Ribicoff to Dr. Leo Davidoff, dated July 9, 1964. Ribicoff states he has urged the Justice Department to provide protection for those participating in the civil rights movement.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection. <br>Typewritten letter from Representative William F. Ryan to Dr. and Mrs. Israel Zwerling dated July 13, 1964. Ryan writes of his recent visit with their son, Matthew Zwerling. He also mentions Dr. Aaron Henry, a civil rights worker from Clarksdale, Mississippi, and the benefit of Matthew's association with him.

From the Zwerling (Matthew) Freedom Summer Collection; Carbon copy of a typewritten letter from Dr. Israel Zwerling to Attorney General Robert Kennedy, dated July 13, 1964. Zwerling expresses disdain for the disparaging remarks made by Police Chief Ben Collins of Clarksdale, Mississippi, to the New York Times regarding civil rights volunteers in Mississippi. He also requests an increase in the presence of federal authorities in the South to protect civil rights workers from harassment, brutality, and intimidation.

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